ALTERNATIVE MOONS



Birgit: As an avid fan of the moon, I immediately took a liking to this book. The duotone printing technique that’s used, with black on black inking, also spoke to me. When browsing through the book I was wondering about these alternative ‘moons. Where were these pictures made? On our own moon? Or other moons in our solar system? Maybe they were made by Cassini? But then again something seems a bit off…

And what does the recipe at the end of the book mean? It took us quite some time to figure this one out but when we did we had quite a laugh about it. I keep thinking and laughing about how I might have bought the book, liking it simply because I like moons and the quality of the book but never really grasping what the moons are made of. Great concept!

Ruby: There is no denying that this book is well-made. It consists of solid choices: the deep black printing of the ‘moons’ as Birgit mentioned, expensive and high-quality paper, and a simple but effective font choice and matching cover. It is clear that the book is very well cared for and isn’t that exactly what we are looking for in this competition? Even though Alternative Moons might tick all the boxes to win a competition like this, it left me slightly disappointed. These solid choices that ensured the book exists in the form it is are to be expected, almost as if they are too logical – a safe bet – and that’s why I find it perhaps a bit boring. Another thing that annoys me is the fact that such beautiful images and beautiful ‘moons’ are in fact pancakes. Instead of finding it witty, I perceive it as a bit of a dumb joke.

Auke: The use of color is well done! The black really sucks you in. It’s also a smart way to keep all the ‘moons’ more interesting scrolling through the book.

Although the materialization makes this book a good competitor I must say I’m not convinced by the way the ‘moons’ are framed. The designer of the book could’ve done more with it. In this case I think the design is too present as I don’t really understand the decisions being made.

 

Malin: I agree with you Auke. Sometimes you see a large image of a ‘moon’, and then again as a smaller image. I was wondering why the ‘moons’ would not stick to the same size in a constant position of the page. I was also wondering what the purpose of the book was. It looks a bit like a school exercise, but then we did not find it in the students section. Anyway, the surprising moment in the end was the reason why we included it in the selection, right?

Ruby: You mean the recipe being the surprising moment? Don’t you guys think that part was already part of the content to start with and has little to do with the ‘verzorging’?

Patrick: The naming of the ‘moons’, unlike the placement of the images, is consistent. A very nice detail that makes the pages more interesting and especially the display of the moons more convincing. Only when you understand the recipe do you also understand the “PC” in the naming.



  • Auteur
    Nadine Schlepper, Robert Pufleb
  • Oplage
    750
  • Omvang
    72
  • Prijs
    25
  • Verschijningsdatum
    978 94 92051 37 0
  • Uitgever / Opdrachtgever
    The Eriskay Connection, Breda
  • Ontwerper(s)
    Nadine Schlepper, Düsseldorf
  • Fotograaf
    Robert Pufleb
  • Drukkerij
    Wilco Art Books, Amersfoort
  • Lithograaf
    Marc Gijzen beeldbewerking & digitale lithografie, Voorburg
  • Boekbinderij
    Boekbinderij Abbringh, Groningen
  • Materiaal
    Paper for interior: 160gsm Metapaper Warm White Rough. Cover: 160gsm Metapaper Warm White Rough.
  • Lettertype
    Univers (Linotype)
  • Technische Bijzonderheden
    printed in double black duotone.
  • ALTERNATIVE MOONS

    Birgit: As an avid fan of the moon, I immediately took a liking to this book. The duotone printing technique that’s used, with black on black inking, also spoke to me. When browsing through the book I was wondering about these alternative ‘moons. Where were these pictures made? On our own moon? Or other moons in our solar system? Maybe they were made by Cassini? But then again something seems a bit off…

    And what does the recipe at the end of the book mean? It took us quite some time to figure this one out but when we did we had quite a laugh about it. I keep thinking and laughing about how I might have bought the book, liking it simply because I like moons and the quality of the book but never really grasping what the moons are made of. Great concept!

    Ruby: There is no denying that this book is well-made. It consists of solid choices: the deep black printing of the ‘moons’ as Birgit mentioned, expensive and high-quality paper, and a simple but effective font choice and matching cover. It is clear that the book is very well cared for and isn’t that exactly what we are looking for in this competition? Even though Alternative Moons might tick all the boxes to win a competition like this, it left me slightly disappointed. These solid choices that ensured the book exists in the form it is are to be expected, almost as if they are too logical – a safe bet – and that’s why I find it perhaps a bit boring. Another thing that annoys me is the fact that such beautiful images and beautiful ‘moons’ are in fact pancakes. Instead of finding it witty, I perceive it as a bit of a dumb joke.

    Auke: The use of color is well done! The black really sucks you in. It’s also a smart way to keep all the ‘moons’ more interesting scrolling through the book.

    Although the materialization makes this book a good competitor I must say I’m not convinced by the way the ‘moons’ are framed. The designer of the book could’ve done more with it. In this case I think the design is too present as I don’t really understand the decisions being made.

     

    Malin: I agree with you Auke. Sometimes you see a large image of a ‘moon’, and then again as a smaller image. I was wondering why the ‘moons’ would not stick to the same size in a constant position of the page. I was also wondering what the purpose of the book was. It looks a bit like a school exercise, but then we did not find it in the students section. Anyway, the surprising moment in the end was the reason why we included it in the selection, right?

    Ruby: You mean the recipe being the surprising moment? Don’t you guys think that part was already part of the content to start with and has little to do with the ‘verzorging’?

    Patrick: The naming of the ‘moons’, unlike the placement of the images, is consistent. A very nice detail that makes the pages more interesting and especially the display of the moons more convincing. Only when you understand the recipe do you also understand the “PC” in the naming.

  • Auteur
    Nadine Schlepper, Robert Pufleb
  • Oplage
    750
  • Omvang
    72
  • Prijs
    25
  • Verschijningsdatum
    978 94 92051 37 0
  • Uitgever / Opdrachtgever
    The Eriskay Connection, Breda
  • Ontwerper(s)
    Nadine Schlepper, Düsseldorf
  • Fotograaf
    Robert Pufleb
  • Drukkerij
    Wilco Art Books, Amersfoort
  • Lithograaf
    Marc Gijzen beeldbewerking & digitale lithografie, Voorburg
  • Boekbinderij
    Boekbinderij Abbringh, Groningen
  • Materiaal
    Paper for interior: 160gsm Metapaper Warm White Rough. Cover: 160gsm Metapaper Warm White Rough.
  • Lettertype
    Univers (Linotype)
  • Technische Bijzonderheden
    printed in double black duotone.